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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 7,683 (some duplicates have been removed)
's not every person for themselves. that isn't going to sell. they don't like it in american life today. i think that's what he was selling, i agree with rick. it was strongly philosophical about community values.
, the japanese american internment project, and also we have another exhibition called relocation and resiliency, the japanese american internment in california. and both of those are up on the 6th floor and this is the last week, so if you haven't a chance to see these exhibits yet, we really encourage you to go on up and see them because they will be closing on sunday. we really want to thank community works for bringing the exhibit if they came for me today to the san francisco public library. and here to tell you a little bit more about community works is ruth morgan, so help me welcome ruth morgan. thank you. . >> thank you. i do hope that if you haven't seen the exhibit, you will go up to the skylight gallery and see it. the project actually involved over 225 young people who studied the japanese internment through the personal stories of 15 people who were interned or impacted by the internment. and the exhibition highlights the individual stories of each of the japanese americans who came into the classroom, as well as the rich student responses to these stories. the project really gave
>> the u.s. president allows the government to continue spying on americans and others without a warrant. you are watching "inside story america" from washington. >> hello. the u.s. capitol is preparing for the inauguration of barack obama. it was before his inauguration four years ago that civil liberties groups had high hopes that president obama would do away with laws put in place by his predecessor that violate u.s. constitutional rights in the name of national security. on sunday, they were disappointed when president obama rhee authorized the foreign intelligence surveillance act 00 re- -- re- authorized the foreign intelligence surveillance act. last week, three u.s. senators tried to amend the legislation to put into protection protections for americans. republicans and democrats came together to reject the proposal in favor of u.s. national security of our constitutional rights. back in our washington, d.c. studios, we are joined by a national security analyst. we also have a legislative counsel for the american civil liberties union and the executive director of the
done wonderful work insisting in the core principles of american civic life. i also wish to extend condolences to the isv community for the recent loss of a great lady and a great scholar, and gallucci. at least to acknowledge gallucci gallucci -- i hope that he would've been pleased at presenting this award to me, as pleased as i am in receiving it. i'm going to proceed as follows. first i'm going to talk about what i call philadelphia sovereignty. second i'm going to examine the ideas of the global governance project, which challenges philadelphia sovereignty. and then we'll move to action and look at the actual activities. fourth, will examine the significance of this conflict between constitutional government and global governance. sovereignty is defending the scholars scholars than most people as westphalian, embodied in the nation state is going the treaty of 1648 and that's true to an extent. when i was working on the book and thinking of coming up with concepts, i relist americans don't think of themselves as westphalian sovereignty. we the people of the united states of am
and nourish our souls. we thank you for the opportunity to gather, to honor four native americans from our community. remember those that are not with us, unable to be here, or traveling. we ask for blessing upon them, their families, their friends. we come before you. we are humbled two leggeds. we give things. honde,honde, the best it could possible me. to the singers, to the dancers, their families. honde, honde to everyone in attendance. ( spiritual chanting). (spiritual chanting). grandfather, creator, once again we come together, and gave praise and honor to you, and if you for the many blessings, and again honde, honde for this day. we say these things in your name. please remain standing as we welcome and present to you the grand entry of our eagle staff and our dancers. here we go. bring em in. carrying the first flag of this nation, of this land, the eagle staff larry harristan. how about a round of applause for larry? thank you larry. bringing in our dancers. (drums). good to see you. our southern and northern dancers. welcome ladies. welcome. followed by our j
.s. government with iranian officials here she's nice to hear professor lecture at american university in washington. the writing has appeared in "the new york times," "politico," foreign policy and washington monthly among others. they came to us last night from virginia, took a late night train and what i'd like to do is turn it over to you for your thoughts and comments to start off. >> thank you very much. i'm going to start for us today. let me thank you much for hosting us to thank you for coming. it's an honor pleasure and we look forward to nature scene discussion today. i'm going to start with two provocative themes from our new book, "going to tehran: why the united states must come to terms with the islamic republic of iran". the first of these means, and these two get at the heart of our book. the united states is today enhanced and for the past two years a power and relative decline in the middle east. the second core team as the biggest beneficiary of american ongoing decline in the middle east is the islamic republic of iran. if you're not sure you agree with these propo
of during the internment camps japanese americans were interned. in this vacuum in japan town, there was the fillmore district with african americans and a variety of other people and they moved into the community. and then japanese americans get out of camp and they come back to their neighborhood that has been populated and made into a different life and different world and what happens when those two communities overlap and intersect? whose place is it, whose home is it? who is an american? how do we sort of coexist in this post war period where the people from that community are by and large marginalized, yet you have this whole kind of other thing happening where it's -- the war has been won, this is like new things, television is happening, advertising, this whole advertising thing is happening. so you have these marginalized peoples and what happens, is it possible to develop a kind of at that moment a cross-cultural community? is it possible to have kind of a multi cultural community that emerged from that moment? and so, in particular, that's what i wanted to explore.
statewide celebration and recognition of asian-pacific islander american heritage month. this event is hosted by the mayor. i will tell you a little bit more. it is a non-profit, non- partisan. since 2001, our focus has been on educating the public on public policy. and fostering the future leaders from our minority communities to serve at federal, state, and local levels. the mission is to empower patients and pacific islander americans in civic and public affairs to education, active participation, and leadership development. >> civic engagement, leadership development, and community servthe theme of tonight's evens a celebration of the achievements and accomplishments of asian-americans in the state of california and our nation. >> ok'ing. -- ok. i would like to introduce our host for this evening. very well known as the first asian-american mayor in san francisco history. mayor lee championed balancing the budget to keep san francisco safe, solvents, and successful. he reformed city pensions. his focus is on economic development, job creation, and building san francisco's future
. this was not globalization. what was happening was american politics and american economics were working against the middle-class. people do this. we decided it. if you look at other countries like germany, they have done better training and so world and their companies and making money so a lot of things we heard that were not impossible, not possible in america were actually happening in germany and their wages have gone up five times faster than ours. there something wrong inside the american political and economic system and that is what this book is about. >> who stole the american dream, hedrick smith is the author. thank you for being on booktv. .. >> the title is taken from a quote from ulysses s. grant. he looked back on his career, and mountain memoirs, he writes frankly about the experiences he had, the good and the bad making for good reading. what he talk about late in life was his role in the u.s.-mexico war in 1846, and grant said, you know, at the time, "i do not think there was ever a more wicked war than that waged on the united states by mexico so i thought at the time as a youngster onl
hopes and aspirations of the american people. on new year's eve -- some of you, a large number of members of congress joined hundreds of people at the national archives building where we observed at midnight the 150th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation. at midnight, there was an enactment of harriet tubman ringing the bell, ringing the bell, and as she rang the bell she said, "now we are free." it was quite an incredible moment and it was one that ushered in what president lincoln would call 'a new birth of freedom' for his era and for generations to come. that transformative moment in our history is a reminder of the best traditions we have as a people -- the ability and the obligation of each generation of americans to renew the promise of our founders, to carry forward the torch of progress, to reignite the american dream. this is who we are as americans. this is the character of our country. this is the strength of our democracy. the strength of our democracy rests on a strong and thriving middle class -- the backbone of our democracy that middle class is. so we h
an incomplete picture of african-american emancipation and the struggle for civil rights that followed. professor happ was interviewed at the university of pennsylvania in philadelphia. part of book tv's college series. >> host: university of pennsylvania history professor, stephen hahn is the author of this book "the political world of slavery and freedom." professor hahn, before we get into the subject of the book, what's the image on the front cover? >> guest: that's a very good question and the answer is i have no idea. the editor proposed -- thought it was a very eye-catching image and when i showed it to friends and colleagues they had no idea what it meant. it doesn't clearly relate to anything in the book but i think they were interested in selling books, and that's how they chose it. i think it is a really interesting photograph, and i think it speaks to sort of complex connections within african-american communities that involve gender as well as power. but beyond that, i don't know. >> host: well, professor hahn, what do going to the topic of the book -- what do we know wron
of the house of delegates of the american bar association, where it first met steve. this is a series of programs underwritten by the charles gesky family, which examines the constitution in the 21st century. this examines the balance between safety, security, and public order, and the protection of civil liberties and the integrity of the constitution on the other. tonight program will focus on threats to our american justice system caused by under-funding and indecisiveness. i would like to mention that the question answer portion of the program will be moderated by a professor geoffrey hazard, a distinguished professor of law at uc hastings. the professor is a leading expert in the field of civil procedure of legal ethics and is good at asking questions. it is my pleasure to introduce our very special guest, stephen zack, president of the american bar association. with nearly 400,000 members, it is the largest volunteer professional membership organization in the world. mr. zack is the first hispanic american to serve as the president and the second to be born abroad. he was only 1
voices for a jewish russian character by way of yokohama, for an african american character, for all these different characters? i know you worked with specific actors. did they help at all? what was the process there? . >> absolutely. in terms of the african american characters, i wrote this piece initially for the act core company and i thought it would be a great challenge to actually write a play for the core company and the core company has two african american characters and i had tailored two of the characters for steven anthony jones and gregry wallace. it's interesting that gregory wallace, an african american man, was supposed to play mr. oge, an excentric neisei who likes literature. i thought it would be an interesting thing to do. but after a while we did a reading and we realized as good an actor as gregory is, it was pushing his limits for him to play a japanese american character in the late 40's. >> i imagine him as being much older. >> in the course of writing the play and using various actors, he became younger. this chinese actor is more like a character in his mi
jobs we need and to make american business is and workers competitive competitive in the global marketplace. simply put, the tax code is a nightmare. it is too complex, too time- consuming and costly. about 6% of individual taxpayers have to hire others to do their tax return because the code is too complicated. as a result, if it were an industry, it would be the largest in the united states and would consume 6.1 billion hours, the equivalent of more than 3 million full-time workers. yes, it is too costly. taxpayers spent -- spent 163 billion complying with the individual and corporate income tax rolls. add to that the fact that the u.s. has the highest corporate tax rate, and an outdated worldwide system of taxation and not to -- it is not too difficult to imagine why many do not view america as an attractive place to hire and invest. nothing about the bill we are considering tonight changes the realities. that is why the ways and means committee will pursue tax recovery of the tax reform in the next congress. -- will pursue tax reform in the next congress. i urge my colleague
you. thank you. >> barack obama was a little- known state senator from an aillinois. the third african-american in the u.s. senate. i spoke to him after his great victory in illinois at a time when most people knew him as a skinny kid with a funny name from the south side of chicago. the phrase you have been accustomed to using, the skinny kid with a funny name from the south side of chicago. beyond that issue, how did you get beyond getting beyonpeople o vote for a guy whose name they could not renounce? >> they still screw it up sometimes. the call me alabama or yo mama. one thing that i confirmed in this race is the american people are decent people. they get confused sometimes. they're busy. there stressed. they are tired. sometimes they are watching fox news, that will get them confused. tavis: yeah. >> when you talk to them about issues, the things we have in common, our belief that every child should have decent shot at life, the vulnerable around us must be cared for and the government have role in that, people respond. one of the things i started off this campaign believing was that if
recounts the mexican-american war in 1846. the author recounts president polk's decision to go to war and the roles that then congressman abraham lincoln and henry clay played in the national debate. this is about an hour. >> thanks, denise. i want to thank everybody who's been so nice to be here at the abraham lincoln presidential center. i've seen the benito juÁrez exhibit which i encourage all of you to go see when there isn't some very big event going on over there, like there is right now. it's a fantastic show, and really the relationship between juÁrez and lincoln is so really intriguing. what i want to talk to you guys about today is my most recent book, "a wicked war: polk, clay, lincoln, and the 1846 invasion of mexico." the title of "a wicked war" is taken from a quote from ulysses s. grant, from late in his life, grant looked back sort of on everything you done in his career and in his memoirs he writes very frankly about the experiences that he is had, the good and bad, and it makes a really good reading. at one thing that grant spent some time thinking and talking of
kind of iraq did the united states leave behind after all the sacrifice, the american lives lost, the tens of thousands wounded, the billions of dollars expended. what was american policy toward iraq and what does iraq look like today said it is the question that i sought to address by in the up pretty much covered in the entire scope of the war since a lot of reporting on it. >> host: so a year on our december 2011 what have we achieved in a year on had we still achieved then? >> guest: well, why the time, by december of 2011, they're had been a number of elections in iraq, which is to the good, but iraq hadn't fully become a democracy in the sense that it hadn't been a peaceful transfer of power from the current regime led by maliki to another pamela starr. i think that is a true test of democracy is whether there isn't an election and russia has elections as i served there there's another candidate wins and power is handed over to that candidate. iraq hasn't set that milestone yet. so, what we had in december of 2011 was a relatively stable iraq, a lot of hopes, but i think un
-- the letters that a couple of, you know, irish americans wrote in response accusing cousin mcpeek of not having a sense of humor. it has to do with these tee shirts that target has produced for the st. patrick's day parade in which mrs. mcpeek derided the fact that they were making fun of the irish in the united states, you know, things like i survived the kelly murphy family gathering, things like that. and they wrote letters poking fun at what i thought was a couragous op ed piece. so this is in response to the irish americans who don't feel the pride that they should. and please excuse if i manhandle the irish manner of speaking. this is a joke told to me by one of my friends. he said that an american, an irish american, was golfing with his wife on a weekend. and he hit the ball into the rough. went looking for it. all of a sudden, a leprechaun jumped up. we're back to the leprechaun theme. he said, top of the morning to you, lad. he says, you're a leprechaun. he says, yes, i am, and you have 3 wishes. three wishes? he says, yes. you have 3 wishes. i want to be a par golfer.. he says, no pr
media organization we are committed to this and in november we are celebrating american heritage indian month with special programs on our television channels including kqed and plus and world. many are provided by native american public television which is actually an organization that produces indian producers and countries with partnership with public television and radio, so it's a fantastic organization and they have shared a lot of unique programs with us. two highlights are racing the redses, a rare view into reservation life homeland, native americans in the armed forces. you will get to meet the four local heroes. that's the term we like to use and people in the community that wins a award that is very special and i think it's important to thank the city of san francisco for hosting this event. -- plawz. thank you. this is really quite a beautiful space and honor to be standing at the base of the stair case and this incredible rotunda and i want to thank the dancers and singers and drummers for sharing their heritage with us and just adds to this special event and be sur
facility in the sahara desert in nearby algeria. we know there were american hostages along with brits and others. we know there was a mission launched today to free them and kill their captors. we don't truly know tonight about casualties or how many americans might have made it out of there alive. we begin with nbc's stephanie gosk on what we do know. >> reporter: using tanks and helicopters, the algerian military launched an operation on their own, to retake the remote gas field from the militants and free the hostages. including at least three americans. algeria says it's over, but details are few, and casualty reports vary widely from a few dead to dozens. u.s. officials are saying little about the operation or the american hostages. >> because of the fluidity and the fact that there is a lot of planning going on, i cannot give you any further details at this time. >> reporter: the militants attacked the sprawling gas facility in the remote sahara wednesday morning, taking dozens of foreign and algerian hostages. confirming algeria's operation to retake the facility, british prime
erg media ♪ [chanting] 1979. while americans stewed in gas lines, congress argued over what to do with 150 million acres of alaskan land. which would we choose? wilderness or mineral development? in 1939, one american in six was unemployed. by 1942, we were fighting a great war and living better than we had in years. how did we increase production of both guns and butter during world war ii? in 1978, a troubled textile industry was told to spend $2 billion combating brown-lung disease. by 1980, the supreme court was asked to choose between saving lives or jobs and profits. how much is a life worth? wilderness or minerals? guns or butter? jobs or safety? we always face choices. resources and scarcity. what's economics all about? with the help of economic analyst richard gill, we'll examine that question on economics usa. i'm david schoumacher. what's economics all about? there have always been theoretical answers to that question, but reality complicates the most elegant theories. economics usa is about theory and reality in 20th-century amica, and how people and events have shaped
times in this house and the american people had an opportunity to vote on that. we ought to be focused on making the act as good as it can be and saving as much money as it can and providing access to affordable quality health tear. . >> but to vote in the committee, they can vote in the our committees in the house we ought to give them that right here as a show of respect to honor their service to american citizens in territories and the district of columbia. as this new congress begins, we have an opportunity to commit ourselves to the spirit of compromise which our constituents so desperately seek. our nation continues to face a number of challenges that can only be addressed by working together and giving every family the opportunity as leaders said when she spoke so eloquently to make it in america. let's take advantage of this session to start off on the right foot and show americans that we are ready to come together to tackle our greatest challenges. i thank the lady for the time and i yield back the balance of my time. >> gentleman from texas >> i want to address the minority
that will prevent a middle-class tax hike from hitting 98% of all americans starting tomorrow. preventing that tax hike has been my top priority. the last thing that folks like the folks appear on this stage can afford right now is to pay an extra $2,000 in taxes next year. middle-class families cannot afford it, businesses cannot afford it, our economy cannot afford it. today, it appears an agreement to prevent this new year's tax hike is within sight. but it is not done. there are still issues left to resolve but we are hopeful that congress can get it done. it is not done. part of the reason i wanted to speak to all of you today is to make sure that we emphasize to congress and members of both parties understand across america that this is a pressing concern on people's minds. now, the potential agreement that is being talked about would not only make sure the taxes don't go up on middle- class families, it also would extend tax credits for families with children, it would extend our tuition tax credit that has helped millions of families pay for college, it would extend tax credits for clean e
. >> the president lays it all on the line for new gun laws. >> this will not happen unless the american people demand it. >> and he calls out the right wing machine that wants to kill reform. >> tonight, congresswoman jackie sleer of california on the president's major announcement. dan gross on the brady campaign and on whether the president's campaign can work. michael steele on the dispickble nra ad attacking the president's kids. >> plus, obama for america is getting the fan back together to fight the nra. >> it is time to get activated, again. >> former obama deputy campaign manager stephanie cutter joins me tonight. and congresswoman january shakowski on the return of the public option. >> good to have you with us tonight. folks, thanks for watching. there cannot be another false start in curbing gun violence in this country. today, the path for change was paved. president obama announced proposals for sweeping reforms to gun laws in this country in the wake of the horror at the wake of the horror at sandy hook elementary, it's gut check time for america. >> this is our first task as a s
.s. government with the iranian officials. she's now a senior professor, lecturer at american university in washington. their writing has appeared in "the new york times," politico, foreign policy and washington monthly, among others. they came to us last night from virginia. they took the late night train and stayed here. and what i'd like to do is just turn it over to you for your thoughts and comments to start off. >> well, thank you very much. i'm going to start off for us today. let me start by thanking you for hosting us. it's a real honor and pleasure, and we look forward to an interesting discussion today. i'm going to start with two provocative themes from our new book, "going to tehran: why the united states must come to terms with the islam you can republic of iran." the first of these themes, and these two really get at the heart of our book. the first of these themes is that the united states is today and has been for the past few years a power in relative decline in the middle east. and the second core theme is that the biggest beneficiary of america's ongoing decline in th
on the american consulate in benghazi, libya. four americans were killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton's testimony had been post toned until now. she took responsibility and emsized her commitment to improving diplomat security abroad. >> as i have mentioned many times i take responsibility and nobody is more committed to getting this right. i am determined to leave the state department and our country safer, stronger, and more secure. now, taking responsibility meant moving quickly in those first uncertain hours and days to respond to the immediate crisis, but, also, to further protect our people and posts in high-threat areas across the region and the world. it meant launching an independent investigation to determine exactly what happened in benghazi and to recommend steps for improvement and it meant intensifying our efforts to cat combat terrorism and figure out effective ways to support emerging democracies in north africa and beyond. >> rose: she was overcome with emotion as she recalled receiving the bodies of the deceased service members.
and stonewall. it will be repeated over and over again as part of the traditions of american rights and civil rights. >> that was really something. to hear him smeng stonewall in the first statements, certainly for gay and lesbian americans, that was a stunning leap forward. >> gigantic. he connected it all to the patriots of 1776. that we keep widening in our democracy. he made those places almost like battlefield spots. like oxford, mississippi or normandy or iwo jima. >> i was going to say time and again when presidents have come here, when they've cited heroes, they've been military heroes. to talk about seneca falls and selma is more about an inclusive america with an emphasis on the quality of opportunity. not upon liberty. a republican would have traditionally given a speech about liberty. >> stonewall was the group of people most marginalized in society and the most shunned who weren't even allowed to congregate in a bar at the same time without getting harassed and arrested. >> stonewall from 1969 has been considered almost alternate left history for a while. now gay studies has come
manager? the projectionist? they were applauding an american success story. no dark humors just the fun of seeing an escapade succeeding, a group of americans escaping from captivity in iran. no cynical anti-heroes, just straight arrow heroes. people serve their country and this scared group that desperately needed their help. i'm glad that it one for drama, i'm glad that "les mis" won. one fictional, one joycely as true as yesterday's headlines. that's "hardball" for now. thanks for being with us. "the ed show" with ed schultz starts right now. >> good evening, americans, and welcome to "the ed show" from new york. the gop is still holding the american economy hostage, and president obama says they won't collect a ransom. this is "the ed show." let's get to work. >> the issue here is whether or not america pays its bills. we are not a deadbeat nation. >> the president draws a line in the sand for republicans. >> they will not collect a ransom in exchange for not crashing the american economy. >> tonight, congressman jim mcdermott's reaction to the president's tough talk on the debt cei
the wealthy. this week we did that. for first time we raised taxes on the wealthiest 2% americans in a bipartisan way and avoiding a middle-class tax hike that could throw the economy back into a recession. 97% of small businesses will not see their income taxes go up one dime. we maid sure that millions of families will continue to see tax credits. companies will continue to receive tax breaks for the research they do, investments they make, and the clean energy jobs they make. two million americans that are out of work will continue to receive unemployment benefits as long as they are actively looking for a job. we still need to do more to put americans back to work while also putting this country on a path to pay down its debt. our economy can't afford more showdowns on the manufacturing crisis along the way. even as our businesses created two million new jobs last year, including 168,000 jobs last month the dysfunction in congress made consumers less confident. we know there is a path forward. i signed into a law a deaf reduction. this week's action further reduces the deaf --
from many nations. or than half one million americans have served in afghanistan. thousands have been wounded. more than 2000 have given their lives. this remains a very difficult mission. the work ahead will not be easy. our forces are still in harms way. make no mistake. our path is clear. we are moving forward. after more than a decade of war, the nation that we need to rebuild is our own. as we do, we need to take care of our troops and veterans who fought in our name. we have to grow our economy entering our deficit. we need to great new jobs and boost family incomes. we have to protect our planet from the destructive effects of climate change. we need to protect our children from the horrors of gun violence. these will be difficult goals for america, but they must be met. if we could have the fraction of the termination of the men and women in, i know that we can meet them. i tend to work hard to make sure that we can. thank you. >> hello. i'm proud to represent the state of nebraska in the u.s. senate. i have traveled thousands of miles all across nebraska meeting with leaders
behind after sacrifice of 145 american lives lost, temperatures of thousands wounded, and hundreds of millions of dollars spent. what was the american policy towards iraq, and what's iraq look like today? that was the question i sought to address, but i covered the entire scope of the war. >> a year op, or, i guess, in december 2011, what had we achieved, and a year on, have we achieved that? >> well, by the time of -- by december 2011, there was a number of elections in iraq which was to the good, but iraq had not fully become a democracy in the sense there was not a peaceful transfer of power from the current regime led to another prime minister. that's a true test of a democracy is whether there's not merely an election, and russia has elections, i serve there, but whether there's an election, another candidate wins, and power is handed over to that candidate. iraq is in the at that milestone yet. what we had in december 2011 was a relatively stable iraq, a lot of hopes, but, i think, unfortunately, the situation in iraq has deteriorated politically over the past year, and, also
>> george: today on christian world news, russia passes a law banning american families from adopting russian children. what it means for that country's 700,000 orphans. and a shocking story of christian persecution in nepal. the most hindu nation in the world. plus, descendents of an ancient tribe of israel return to their home. how christians are helping to fulfill biblical prophecy. ♪ >> george: a new russian law bans americans from adopting russian children. hello, everyone, i'm george thomas. my colleague, wendy griffith is on holiday. russian president va vladimir putin signed a law preventing thousands of russian orphans to go to americans. john waggi plains. >> reporter: michelle mobley has quite a collection of toys and clothes. they were gathering them for a little one who would soon join them. >> we always wanted to adopt. we decided this is the time. >> reporter: the christian nebraska couple has a blog site telling of their wait for 6-year-old artem, who spent his whole life in a russian orphanage. his mother gave him up when she learned he had down syndrome. b
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